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Archaeology, Cultural Heritage, and the Antiquities
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Neil Brodie, Morag M. Kersel, Christina Luke, and Kathryn Walker Tubb

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780813029726

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813029726.001.0001

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From the Ground to the Buyer A Market Analysis of the Trade in Illegal Antiquities

From the Ground to the Buyer A Market Analysis of the Trade in Illegal Antiquities

Chapter:
(p.188) 9 From the Ground to the Buyer A Market Analysis of the Trade in Illegal Antiquities
Source:
Archaeology, Cultural Heritage, and the Antiquities Trade
Author(s):

Neil Brodie

Morag M. Kersel

Kathryn Walker Tubb

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813029726.003.0010

This chapter investigates the structure of the global antiquities market and identifies what in functional terms may be characterized as three separate markets through which artifacts may pass on their journey from the ground to the collector. They are, respectively, archaeologically-rich (source), transit, and destination markets. In particular, the chapter sets out a model of the trade in antiquities, highlighting its defining or unique features. It also offers concrete data illustrating the pathway of an artifact. In light of this model, some appropriate countermeasures for combating illegal trade are proposed. A concerted effort to integrate all aspects of the trade in antiquities must be made to efficiently address the issues of how artifacts travel from the ground to the buyer. The mechanisms currently in place to combat the illegal excavation of archaeological sites do not appear to be acting as deterrents. In order for the countermeasures to succeed, all of the various factions should be united.

Keywords:   antiquities market, illegal trade, illegal antiquities, artifact, illegal excavation, buyer, market analysis

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