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Archaeology, Cultural Heritage, and the Antiquities
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Neil Brodie, Morag M. Kersel, Christina Luke, and Kathryn Walker Tubb

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780813029726

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813029726.001.0001

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Illicit Trafficking and Trade in Indian Antiquities Renewed Efforts to Save and Preserve India's Heritage

Illicit Trafficking and Trade in Indian Antiquities Renewed Efforts to Save and Preserve India's Heritage

Chapter:
(p.236) 12 Illicit Trafficking and Trade in Indian Antiquities Renewed Efforts to Save and Preserve India's Heritage
Source:
Archaeology, Cultural Heritage, and the Antiquities Trade
Author(s):

Neil Brodie

Morag M. Kersel

Kathryn Walker Tubb

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813029726.003.0013

This chapter discusses some of the tribulations faced by a source country, in this case India, when infiltrated by the antiquities trade. It first introduces the new problem of cyber-crime and the prevention of crime against written heritage. It also deals with the recovery of archaeological heritage illegally removed from India. In addition, the Bodh Gaya Buddha, the sculpture of Lakulisa, and the sculpture of Krishnajanma are described. One new aspect of the trade is that the national government's policy of opening the Indian market and making its economy more internationally responsive has brought about new threats to the Indian subcontinent. As more and more tourists visit India, with their foreign exchange that helps boost the economy, the danger to cultural heritage has increased, as there are many who would like to acquire cultural objects at any price, whether legally or illegally.

Keywords:   illicit trafficking, antiquities trade, Indian antiquities, India, cyber-crime, written heritage, Bodh Gaya Buddha, Lakulisa, Krishnajanma, archaeological heritage

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