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Race, Religion, and Economic Change in the Republican
SouthA Study of a Southern City$
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Matthew T. Corrigan

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780813031606

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813031606.001.0001

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Southern Religion Meets Modern Politics

Southern Religion Meets Modern Politics

Chapter:
(p.58) 4 Southern Religion Meets Modern Politics
Source:
Race, Religion, and Economic Change in the Republican South
Author(s):

Matthew T. Corrigan

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813031606.003.0004

This chapter discusses how the rise of the Republicans has impacted on the difficult relationship between religion and politics in the South. The important political influence of conservative Protestant churches and Catholic churches in the Republican Party has helped to mobilize churchgoing whites. In general, African American voters still view their churches as sources of political guidance. Since religious beliefs are particularly intense and consistent, the increased political activity of white churches has added another dynamic to the relationship between whites and blacks in the South. Since the end of the Civil War, religious worship in Jacksonville has been a source of racial segregation. Churches are now sources of political segregation as well, with Democrats dominating black churches and Republicans attending white churches. This phenomenon adds another layer of political separation between blacks and whites. Although blacks and whites who regularly attend church agree on many social issues, there is stark disagreement relating to economic issues and national security. Thus, black and white churches are centers of organization for competing political parties.

Keywords:   Republicans, religion, politics, Southern states, Protestant churches, Catholic churches, political activity, blacks, whites, political separation

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