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Cannibal Joyce$
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Thomas Jackson Rice

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780813032191

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813032191.001.0001

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A Taste For/of “inferior Literary Style”

A Taste For/of “inferior Literary Style”

The (Tom) Swiftian Comedy of Scylla and Charybdis

Chapter:
(p.73) 5 A Taste For/of “inferior Literary Style”
Source:
Cannibal Joyce
Author(s):

Thomas Jackson Rice

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813032191.003.0005

This chapter discusses the “high” cultural sources in such way to identify Joyce's indebtedness to some of the literature that readers would readily find accessible. This chapter does not intend to make a case for the indebtedness of Joyce to mass culture rather this chapter illustrates Joyce's method of cultural transfer and incorporation to make two collateral points: that his creative cannibalization of “high” and the “low” is instrumental in Joyce' experimentation of the wide possibilities of fiction and that his cannibalism is not the consequence of his political formation but also provides him basis for voicing through assimilation of and resistance to his political view.

Keywords:   high cultural sources, Joyce, mass culture, cultural transfer, incorporation, cannibalization, cannibalism, political view

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