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T. Thomas Fortune, the Afro-American AgitatorA Collection of Writings, 1880-1928$
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Shawn Leigh Alexander

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780813032320

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813032320.001.0001

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A New Party/But It Will Be!

A New Party/But It Will Be!

Chapter:
(p.24) 5 A New Party/But It Will Be!
Source:
T. Thomas Fortune, the Afro-American Agitator
Author(s):

Shawn Leigh Alexander

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813032320.003.0005

This chapter presents “A New Party” and “But It Will Be!”—editorials written while finishing Black and White—where Fortune demonstrates his growing belief that the conditions of workers, black and white, were the same and, consequently, so was their cause. He called for workers “of the South, the North and the West” to create “a solid front to the masterful forces which press them down.” “Opposition to this unification,” he argued, “is suicidal.” Equally important, Fortune attempted to demonstrate that the same economic forces that were shaping the lives of white workers, here and abroad, were also affecting the lives of the African Americans. Because of this, according to Fortune, blacks should have an equal place in the struggle for economic justice. These are themes that he would further develop in the latter half of Black and White.

Keywords:   editorials, black laborers, white laborers, African Americans, economic justice, equality

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