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Chaucer from Prentice to PoetThe Metaphor of Love in Dream Visions and Troilus and Criseyde$
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Edward I. Condren

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780813032412

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813032412.001.0001

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Troilus and Criseyde

Troilus and Criseyde

Chapter:
(p.140) 6 Troilus and Criseyde
Source:
Chaucer from Prentice to Poet
Author(s):

Edward I. Condren

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813032412.003.0006

This chapter discusses two parallels that require special notice, due to Chaucer's handling, having matured very noticeably by the time he began his poem of love in Troy, which may escape notice. First, mathematics has an important function in Troilus and Criseyde, yet it draws such casual attention that its importance has been overlooked. Second, the reliance on earlier literature, from which Book of the Duchess, Parliament of Fowls, and House of Fame select a central theme to emphasize, appears in Troilus and Criseyde as a subject unto itself, elevated for special scrutiny throughout the whole poem.

Keywords:   parallels, Chaucer, mathematics, Troilus and Criseyde, central theme, special scrutiny, Book of the Duchess, Parliament of Fowls, House of Fame

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