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Mississippian Mortuary PracticesBeyond Hierarchy and the Representationist Perspective$
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Lynne P. Sullivan and Robert C. Mainfort

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780813034263

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813034263.001.0001

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The Mortuary Assemblage from the Holliston Mills Site, a Mississippian Town in Upper East Tennessee

The Mortuary Assemblage from the Holliston Mills Site, a Mississippian Town in Upper East Tennessee

Chapter:
(p.250) 13 The Mortuary Assemblage from the Holliston Mills Site, a Mississippian Town in Upper East Tennessee
Source:
Mississippian Mortuary Practices
Author(s):

Jay D. Franklin

Elizabeth K. Price

Lucinda M. Langstqn

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813034263.003.0013

This essay examines the archaeology of the nearby Holliston Mills site, a Mississippian town in Upper East Tennessee, with particular focus on mortuary patterning. The Holliston Mills site is located on the north bank of the Holston River south of Kingsport in Hawkins County, Tennessee. The site was excavated by members of the Tennessee Archaeological Society between 1968 and 1972. It was excavated in ten-foot blocks using six-inch levels, revealing a large late prehistoric (and perhaps protohistoric) town represented by at least two palisades, more than 660 burials, a large public structure, and several smaller domestic structures. The excavators initially reported the recovery of what they believed to be Cobb Island pottery in the plow zone and much Dallas material from the level excavations, but they also noted that the site had been looted prior to their excavations. There is little, if any, Cobb Island pottery, but there are some Pisgah ceramics. This essay also describes the sociopolitical organization at Holliston Mills and in Upper East Tennessee.

Keywords:   Holliston Mills, Mississippian town, Upper East Tennessee, palisades, burials, pottery, ceramics, sociopolitical organization, Cobb Island

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