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Cultural Heritage ManagementA Global Perspective$
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Phyllis Mauch Messenger and George S. Smith

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780813034607

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813034607.001.0001

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Descendant Communities, Heritage Resource Law, and Heritage Areas

Descendant Communities, Heritage Resource Law, and Heritage Areas

Strategies for Managing and Interpreting Native American Traditional and Cultural Places

Chapter:
(p.199) 15 Descendant Communities, Heritage Resource Law, and Heritage Areas
Source:
Cultural Heritage Management
Author(s):

David W. Morgan

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813034607.003.0016

The recognition of subaltern histories in the United States, and of contradictory interpretations of heritage sites, occurred largely as part of the social upheavals of the 1960s civil rights movement. It was the Native American organizations and tribes who most vigorously advocated recognition of the legitimacy of their heritage. Their integral roles were codified over the next few decades in legislation that defined the course of heritage resource management in the United States. This chapter focuses on the peculiarities of the political awakening of Native Americans in the United States and their role in federal heritage resource management. It concludes that National Heritage Areas are a management strategy, and they may prove an effective framework within which to interpret and manage the heritage of descendant communities, including Native Americans.

Keywords:   heritage sites, civil rights movement, Native Americans, tribes, heritage resource management, United States, political awakening, federal heritage resource management, descendant communities

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