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American Railroad Labor and the Genesis of the New Deal, 1919–1935$
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Jon R. Huibregtse

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780813034652

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813034652.001.0001

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The Road to Political Power, 1922–1924

The Road to Political Power, 1922–1924

Chapter:
(p.51) 5 The Road to Political Power, 1922–1924
Source:
American Railroad Labor and the Genesis of the New Deal, 1919–1935
Author(s):

Jon R. Huibregtse

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813034652.003.0005

This chapter discusses the legislative struggles between the election of 1924 and the passage of the Railway Labor Act (RLA) in May 1926, which laid important legal framework for the National Labor Relations Act of 1935. The elections of 1924 thus brought the first stage of railroad labor's battle to bring the Railroad Labor Board to a close. The unions presented the Howell-Barkley Bill to Congress and forced the GOP to recognize the need to amend the Transportation Act. Union leaders continued to work behind the scenes to strengthen their position. By remaining politically active, and even threatening to some, the brotherhoods assured themselves a voice in the creation of new legislation.

Keywords:   Railway Labor Act, National Labor Relations Act, Howell-Barkley Bill, Railroad Labor Board, Congress

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