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The Whaling Expedition of the Ulysses
1937–38$
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Quentin R. Walsh and P. J. Capelotti

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780813034799

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813034799.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use (for details see www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 12 December 2018

The Ulysses and Her Cruise

The Ulysses and Her Cruise

Chapter:
(p.34) 2 The Ulysses and Her Cruise
Source:
The Whaling Expedition of the Ulysses 1937–38
Author(s):

Quentin R. Walsh

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813034799.003.0002

This chapter provides an account of the whaling expedition of the Ulysses. The Ulysses was an oil tanker when it was purchased by the Western Operating Corporation. As this type of vessel, it was reputed to have been a source of trouble. From the moment the idea of whaling under the American registry was conceived, the Western Operating Corporation felt that they were competing against time. The Ulysses was supposed to be on the Australian whaling grounds by June 1937, but apparently the idea for sending out the expedition did not surface until the autumn of 1936, and plans commenced in January 1937 meaning that time was incredibly tight. Furthermore, The Bulysses, a British tanker, also arrived alongside the Ulysses to take fifteen hundred tons of fuel oil from the factory ship.

Keywords:   Ulysses, Western Operating Corporation, Australian whaling grounds, Bulysses, factory ship

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