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Stalking the U-BoatU.S. Naval Aviation in Europe during World War I$
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Geoffrey L. Rossano

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780813034881

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813034881.001.0001

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Spinning the Spider Web

Spinning the Spider Web

Naval Aviation in England

Chapter:
(p.149) 6 Spinning the Spider Web
Source:
Stalking the U-Boat
Author(s):

Geoffrey L. Rossano

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813034881.003.0007

Despite its sizable aviation efforts in France, the American Navy looked principally toward Britain for guidance. During the war Britain constructed an enormous number of air stations, depots, training establishments, and experimental sites. Its technical advances dwarfed those of other nations. The Admiralty supported extensive activities to combat the submarine menace, protect the homeland from aerial attack, and provide eyes for the fleet, utilizing dirigibles, kite balloons, land planes, seaplanes, and the world's most advanced flying boats. The vast reach of the Royal Naval Air Service stretched from Scotland to France, the Mediterranean, Greece, Egypt, Africa, and Iraq.

Keywords:   naval aviation, England, American Navy, submarine, aerial attack, flying boats

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