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Failed SanctionsWhy the U.S. Embargo against Cuba Could Never Work$
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Paolo Spadoni

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780813035154

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813035154.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.177) Conclusion
Source:
Failed Sanctions
Author(s):

Paolo Spadoni

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813035154.003.0006

This chapter summarizes the main findings of the study of the U.S. economic embargo against Cuba and provides some suggestions for a more effective U.S. policy toward Cuba. The United States and Cuba face a tough road toward finding a common ground. Five decades of animosities and mutual distrust are not so easy to erase. Havana has made abundantly clear that it will not make any unilateral concessions to improve relations with its powerful northern neighbor. Washington is still defending the embargo as a useful instrument of economic coercion. In reality, the greatest accomplishment of the embargo was to undermine U.S. ability to influence positive changes on the island while failing to deprive the Castro government of the financial wherewithal to resist those changes.

Keywords:   economic embargo, U.S. policy, unilateral concession, Castro government, economic transaction, Cuban-American community

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