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Misfortunes and Shipwrecks in the Seas of the Indies, Islands, and Mainland of the Ocean Sea (1513–1548)Book Fifty of the 'General and Natural History of the Indies'$
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Gonzalo Fernandez de Oviedo

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780813035406

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813035406.001.0001

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Of the father and son who were adrift on a plank until the father died; and how the son escaped.

Of the father and son who were adrift on a plank until the father died; and how the son escaped.

Chapter:
(p.5) Chapter I Of the father and son who were adrift on a plank until the father died; and how the son escaped.
Source:
Misfortunes and Shipwrecks in the Seas of the Indies, Islands, and Mainland of the Ocean Sea (1513–1548)
Author(s):

Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813035406.003.0002

This chapter recounts how in 1513, a ship from Spain bound for Hispaniola went off course and ran aground on the coast of Tierra Firme near the Río Grande, which is west of Santa Marta harbor. Everyone on the ship saw that there was no escape nor had they any possibility of saving themselves since if they were not drowned at sea, on land they would face death from the savage Carib Indians of that coast who were expert bowmen and cannibals. Aboard ship were a father and son from Seville and, faced with that situation, the old man told his son of about twenty-five years of age that they should take care of themselves the best they can and look to their own ingenuity until all else fails. The young man did as he was told. Many drowned there. Those who survived and made it to land were later killed by the Indians.

Keywords:   ship, Spain, Hispaniola, Tierra Firme, Río Grande, Carib Indians, cannibals, father, son, Seville

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