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Misfortunes and Shipwrecks in the Seas of the Indies, Islands, and Mainland of the Ocean Sea (1513–1548)Book Fifty of the 'General and Natural History of the Indies'$
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Gonzalo Fernandez de Oviedo

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780813035406

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813035406.001.0001

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Which is more than a shipwreck tale because it treats of a marvelous event which is given in an extraordinary report of the very famous and powerful river called the marañón, along which Captain Francisco de Orellana and other hidalgos navigated more than two thousand leagues for eight months until arriving in Christian lands at Las Perlas Island (or Cubagua) in this oceanic region, and from there the captain came to this city of Santo Domingo with some soldiers from his company, participants in his travails and witnesses to everything herein contained;1 all this as recorded by a devout and reverend father of the Order of Preachers Friars, Gaspar de Carvajal,2 who was present in person for everything and who relates the lesson and brief history in the following fashion:3

Which is more than a shipwreck tale because it treats of a marvelous event which is given in an extraordinary report of the very famous and powerful river called the marañón, along which Captain Francisco de Orellana and other hidalgos navigated more than two thousand leagues for eight months until arriving in Christian lands at Las Perlas Island (or Cubagua) in this oceanic region, and from there the captain came to this city of Santo Domingo with some soldiers from his company, participants in his travails and witnesses to everything herein contained;1 all this as recorded by a devout and reverend father of the Order of Preachers Friars, Gaspar de Carvajal,2 who was present in person for everything and who relates the lesson and brief history in the following fashion:3

Chapter:
(p.107) Chapter XXIV Which is more than a shipwreck tale because it treats of a marvelous event which is given in an extraordinary report of the very famous and powerful river called the marañón, along which Captain Francisco de Orellana and other hidalgos navigated more than two thousand leagues for eight months until arriving in Christian lands at Las Perlas Island (or Cubagua) in this oceanic region, and from there the captain came to this city of Santo Domingo with some soldiers from his company, participants in his travails and witnesses to everything herein contained;1 all this as recorded by a devout and reverend father of the Order of Preachers Friars, Gaspar de Carvajal,2 who was present in person for everything and who relates the lesson and brief history in the following fashion:3
Source:
Misfortunes and Shipwrecks in the Seas of the Indies, Islands, and Mainland of the Ocean Sea (1513–1548)
Author(s):

Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813035406.003.0025

This chapter describes the travails of Captain Francisco de Orellana and his fifty companions from the encampment of the governor of Quito, Gonzalo Pizarro, brother of the Marquis don Francisco Pizarro, appointed governor of New Castile (or Peru) by the Caesarean Majesty of the emperor-king. Captain Gonzalo Pizarro went inland on a mission of discovery and conquest of the province of Canela as some cinnamon collected by Indians which had passed from hand to hand had come to the attention of the Spaniards in Quito in the southern Antarctic Pole. The news was welcome, as it was thought that the discovery of such groves and spices would result in great service to God in the conversion of the Indians who possessed the cinnamon and a very useful increase for the royal treasury as well as many other benefits and revelations expected from this enterprise.

Keywords:   Francisco de Orellana, encampment, Gonzalo Pizarro, Canela, Spaniards, Quito, God, conversion, Indian, cinnamon

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