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Misfortunes and Shipwrecks in the Seas of the Indies, Islands, and Mainland of the Ocean Sea (1513–1548)Book Fifty of the 'General and Natural History of the Indies'$
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Gonzalo Fernandez de Oviedo

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780813035406

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813035406.001.0001

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Of the Shipwreck and Marvelous event that befell a reverend canon of the holy cathedral of this our city of Santo Domingo on the island of Hispaniola and to others who experienced this crisis, from which they escaped by God's mercy in the manner that will be related here.

Of the Shipwreck and Marvelous event that befell a reverend canon of the holy cathedral of this our city of Santo Domingo on the island of Hispaniola and to others who experienced this crisis, from which they escaped by God's mercy in the manner that will be related here.

Chapter:
(p.148) Chapter XXV Of the Shipwreck and Marvelous event that befell a reverend canon of the holy cathedral of this our city of Santo Domingo on the island of Hispaniola and to others who experienced this crisis, from which they escaped by God's mercy in the manner that will be related here.
Source:
Misfortunes and Shipwrecks in the Seas of the Indies, Islands, and Mainland of the Ocean Sea (1513–1548)
Author(s):

Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813035406.003.0026

This chapter relates the greed of those who busied themselves in pearl harvesting on the islands of Cubagua and Margarita, provinces and coasts of Paria, Araya, and Cumaná. Those people were so thorough and diligent that they exhausted the profit of that business to the point that the trade almost totally ceased. A few years later, some pearl beds were discovered on the same coast more to the west around the cape called La Vela and thereabouts. Some residents of Cubagua, Santa Marta, and Hispaniola and of other parts went there to settle. Many pearls were brought to Hispaniola and sent on to Spain. With the news of the discovery, many from this city outfitted expeditions at great expense. Among them was a reverend father, canon of this holy cathedral, named García de la Roca, who spent much money on this business for ships, canoes, slave-divers, supplies, and other expenses.

Keywords:   pearls, Cubagua, Margarita, La Vela, Hispaniola, Spain, expeditions, García de la Roca

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