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Misfortunes and Shipwrecks in the Seas of the Indies, Islands, and Mainland of the Ocean Sea (1513–1548)Book Fifty of the 'General and Natural History of the Indies'$
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Gonzalo Fernandez de Oviedo

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780813035406

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813035406.001.0001

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Of a ship that sank in the Ocean Sea1 three hundred leagues from land; of how all the people on board survived for twelve days in the ship's boat without drinking or eating anything except for two pounds of hardtack.

Of a ship that sank in the Ocean Sea1 three hundred leagues from land; of how all the people on board survived for twelve days in the ship's boat without drinking or eating anything except for two pounds of hardtack.

Chapter:
(p.14) Chapter IV Of a ship that sank in the Ocean Sea1 three hundred leagues from land; of how all the people on board survived for twelve days in the ship's boat without drinking or eating anything except for two pounds of hardtack.
Source:
Misfortunes and Shipwrecks in the Seas of the Indies, Islands, and Mainland of the Ocean Sea (1513–1548)
Author(s):

Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813035406.003.0005

Other ships of the fleet returned to Spain, among them one whose master was Pedro Fernández Exuero, a native of Palos, Spain, and whose pilot was a certain Antón Calvo, a good man and expert navigator. The ship left the port of Darién and came to Hispaniola along the northern route. After taking aboard the necessary fresh supplies, it sailed in very fair weather. Three hundred or more leagues out to sea from Hispaniola the ship began taking on so much water that even two pumps could not save it and finally it sank in the ocean. When the twenty-five people on board saw that there was no way to staunch the flow of water they hurried to break out the ship's boat. However, with God's help, the boat was freed from the ship at the moment when the ship was almost submerged.

Keywords:   ships, Spain, Pedro Fernández Exuero, Antón Calvo, Darién, Hispaniola, God, boat

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