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Misfortunes and Shipwrecks in the Seas of the Indies, Islands, and Mainland of the Ocean Sea (1513–1548)Book Fifty of the 'General and Natural History of the Indies'$
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Gonzalo Fernandez de Oviedo

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780813035406

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813035406.001.0001

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of two ships coming from spain to this island of Hispaniola; and the one two days ahead of the other was shipwrecked, the people aboard marooned on a deserted islet; and how two days later the second ship ran aground and sank upright on another nearby low-lying islet; and how miraculously the second ship was refloated and collected [317] the people from the first lost ship and came to this city of santo domingo, where the ship was repaired and returned to spain.

of two ships coming from spain to this island of Hispaniola; and the one two days ahead of the other was shipwrecked, the people aboard marooned on a deserted islet; and how two days later the second ship ran aground and sank upright on another nearby low-lying islet; and how miraculously the second ship was refloated and collected [317] the people from the first lost ship and came to this city of santo domingo, where the ship was repaired and returned to spain.

Chapter:
(p.21) Chapter VI of two ships coming from spain to this island of Hispaniola; and the one two days ahead of the other was shipwrecked, the people aboard marooned on a deserted islet; and how two days later the second ship ran aground and sank upright on another nearby low-lying islet; and how miraculously the second ship was refloated and collected [317] the people from the first lost ship and came to this city of santo domingo, where the ship was repaired and returned to spain.
Source:
Misfortunes and Shipwrecks in the Seas of the Indies, Islands, and Mainland of the Ocean Sea (1513–1548)
Author(s):

Gonzalo Fernández de Oviedo

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813035406.003.0007

In 1523, a convoy of two ships sailed from Spain to Santo Domingo. The captain and master of one was Francisco Vara, a resident of Triana, and the captain of the other was Diego Sánchez Colchero, likewise of Triana or Seville. When they came near the islands called the Virgins, Francisco Vara's ship was wrecked on the shoals of one of them. The ship and its cargo were lost but the people survived. The second ship struck other shoals close to an island called Anegada because it is very low and is not visible until you are upon it. The ship ran onto a slender, pointed rock which penetrated the space between two of the ship's ribs and became firmly lodged there in the planking. By operating the pump and bailing out the water in every way possible, they were able to refloat the ship.

Keywords:   convoy, ships, Spain, Santo Domingo, Francisco Vara, Diego Sánchez Colchero, islands, Virgins, shoals, Anegada

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