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From Sun Cities to the VillagesA History of Active Adult, Age-restricted Communities$
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Judith Ann Trolander

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780813036045

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813036045.001.0001

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Democratizing Wintering in the South

Democratizing Wintering in the South

Chapter:
(p.12) 1 Democratizing Wintering in the South
Source:
From Sun Cities to the Villages
Author(s):

Judith Ann Trolander

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813036045.003.0002

This chapter describes how the rich discovered the pleasures of a Florida winter in the late nineteenth century, and people of much more modest means were not far behind them. This chapter begins with the elite and introduces Edison. In his own personal situation, the reason he built two identical houses in Fort Myers was his expectation that his business partner would join him there. However, Edison quickly “had a falling out” with that man. Then, in 1916, automaker Henry Ford built a bungalow next to the Edison property so he and his wife “could winter with the Edisons.” The Edison story is a good example of one migrant attracting another, but other members of the elite promoted wintering in or at least traveling to, Florida on a more significant, national scale.

Keywords:   Florida winter, nineteenth century, Edison, Fort Myers, Henry Ford

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