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Rethinking Anthropological Perspectives on Migration$
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Graciela S. Cabana and Jeffery J. Clark

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780813036076

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813036076.001.0001

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A Numic Migration? Ethnographic Evidence Revisited

A Numic Migration? Ethnographic Evidence Revisited

Chapter:
(p.191) 9 A Numic Migration? Ethnographic Evidence Revisited
Source:
Rethinking Anthropological Perspectives on Migration
Author(s):

Catherine S. Fowler

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813036076.003.0010

This chapter reviews the ethnographic evidence for and against the hypothesis that speakers of languages of the Numic branch of the Uto-Aztecan language family expanded/migrated within the last 1,000 to 2,000 years into the Great Basin of Western North American from a homeland somewhere in the southwestern corner of their present geographic range. The evidence reviewed includes documentary records, indigenous oral traditions, and cultural patterns (culture traits, material culture, cultural processes, naming). It concludes that the hypothesis remains viable, although the evidence is slim, and suggests several points to investigate for the future.

Keywords:   migration, ethnoarchaeology, Uto-Aztecan languages, Numic languages, Numic origins, oral tradition, linguistic prehistory

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