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French Colonial Archaeology in the Southeast and Caribbean$
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Kenneth G. Kelly and Meredith D. Hardy

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780813036809

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813036809.001.0001

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Commoditization of Persons, Places, and Things During Biloxi's Second Tenure as Capital of French Colonial Louisiana

Commoditization of Persons, Places, and Things During Biloxi's Second Tenure as Capital of French Colonial Louisiana

Chapter:
(p.47) 4 Commoditization of Persons, Places, and Things During Biloxi's Second Tenure as Capital of French Colonial Louisiana
Source:
French Colonial Archaeology in the Southeast and Caribbean
Author(s):

KENNETH G. KELLY

MEREDITH D. HARDY

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813036809.003.0004

In an effort to promote the self-sufficiency of the Louisiana colony and in pursuit of financial gain, French bureaucrats mobilized persons, places, and things into a commodity context. However, anomalous artifact forms recovered from four archaeological sites on and in the environs of the Biloxi peninsula evidence local resistance to their carefully ordered mercantilist strategies. Guided by Le Blond de la Tour's 1722 map titled Carte de Partie de la Coste du Nouveau Biloxy, Avec Les Iles des Environs, this chapter surveys archaeological investigations conducted at Old Biloxi, New Biloxi, the African Habitation Site, and Ship Island, and investigates archaeological manifestations of resistance that suggest early-eighteenth-century processes much akin to contemporary processes of globalization.

Keywords:   Biloxi, commoditization, mercantilism, globalization, resistance

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