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A Civil Society DeferredThe Tertiary Grip of Violence in the Sudan$
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Abdullahi A. Gallab

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780813036885

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813036885.001.0001

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Constructing New Identities

Constructing New Identities

Chapter:
(p.23) 2 Constructing New Identities
Source:
A Civil Society Deferred
Author(s):

Abdullahi A. Gallab

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813036885.003.0002

This chapter addresses the sociopolitical construction of the newborn Sudan in the twentieth century, and the events and processes that shaped it. These processes include violent domination and subjugation, which, like a malignant brain tumor, provoked the immune responses of various forms of resistance and change. These processes profoundly affected the social, cultural, and political structures of the colonial state, and greatly influenced the postcolonial state. At the same time, they have systematically continued to produce ever-growing, conflict-charged effects in the fields of power, the state, its workers, and the nationalist community of the state, as well as in conditions that empower or suppress the existence and growth of a civil society and undergird the Sudanese lifestyle. Key to understanding the role of colonial and postcolonial experiences in the formation of the state in the Sudan are the similarities and differences between the developments and interactions of the dialectical opposites that characterize these experiences. At the same time, these experiences entail a series of peculiar historical relationships.

Keywords:   colonial state, Churchill, Kitchener, Cromer, Wingate, Karari, Khalifa Abdullahi, community

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