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Seated by the SeaThe Maritime History of Portland, Maine, and Its Irish Longshoremen$

Michael C. Connolly

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780813037226

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813037226.001.0001

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(p.xix) Chronology

(p.xix) Chronology

Source:
Seated by the Sea
Publisher:
University Press of Florida

1623

Christopher Leavitt (Levett) provisioned House Island

1633

George Cleeve and Richard Tucker settled peninsula

1658

Falmouth in Casco Bay settlement began to emerge

1676

Falmouth destroyed by the Abenaki (Wabanaki)

1690

Falmouth again overrun by Native Americans

1690–1715

Settlement virtually abandoned

1718

Incorporation of town of Falmouth in Casco Bay

1718

Arrival of McCallum from Ireland with twenty families

1727

First masts shipped to British Navy from Stroudwater

1774

Intolerable Acts

1775 (June 3)

ƠBriens seized HMS Margaretta

1775 (October 18)

Falmouth destroyed by Lt. Henry Mowatt

1786

Portland (Neck) incorporates, separated from Falmouth

1796

Launching of the Portland

1807–08

Embargo Act crippled Maine shipping

1807

Portland Observatory built by Lemuel Moody

1808

St. Patrick's Catholic Church (Damariscotta Mills) built

1813 (September 5)

Enterprise defeated the British Boxer

1820 (March 15)

Maine statehood

1820–32

Portland served as Maine's capital

1823 (August)

Kennebec Steam Navigation Company founded

1828

Abyssinian Church (Sumner, now Newbury Street) built

1830 (November 1)

First Mass at St. Dominic's Church (Portland)

1830–70

Cumberland and Oxford Canal completed

1832

Portland incorporated as a city

1832–66

Portland's cultural and economic “Golden Years”

1843

Portland Steam Packet Co. (Portland to Boston) founded

1845–49

Irish potato famine and large-scale emigration

1853 (July 18)

Portland linked to Montreal by Atlantic and St. Lawrence Railroad (A&StLRR)

1853

A&StLRR leased to Grand Trunk Railroad

1853

Arrival of the SS Sarah Sands (service to Liverpool)

1855

Portland Sugar Company chartered (John Bundy Brown)

1850s

Know-Nothing (Nativist) agitation in Maine

1860

International Steamship Co. (to Boston and Maritimes)

1861–65

Civil War

1863 (June 26)

Caleb Cushing seized by Confederate raiders

1864 (February 22)

RMS Bohemian sank off Cape Elizabeth

1864 (May and July)

Portland Longshoremen's Benevolent Association strikes

1866 (June)

Fenian Brotherhood invasion of Canada from Eastport

1866 (July 4)

Great Portland Fire (1,800 buildings lost)

1866

Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception (Portland) built

1869

Transcontinental railroad completed

1871 (September 5)

Death of John A. Poor (born 1808 in Andover)

1875–1900

Bishop James Augustine Healy serves the Diocese of Portland as the first black Catholic Bishop in America

1880 (November 15)

Portland Longshoremen's Benevolent Society (PLSBS) incorporated

1885

Meeting of Bishop J. A. Healy and Terence Powderly, president of the Knights of Labor (KOL)

1886 (December 24)

Wreck of Annie Maguire off Portland Head

1892

International Longshoremen's Association (ILA) founded

1892–1909

Daniel J. Keefe is ILA's first president

1898 (November 26)

Sinking of the Portland off Cape Cod

1900

Portland serviced by seven transatlantic shipping companies

1901–06

Bishop William Henry ƠConnell

1904

Workingmen's Club opened (21 Commercial Street)

1906–24

Bishop Louis S. Walsh

1909–21

T. V. ƠConnor is ILA president

1911 (November 1-January 9)

Longshore strike in Portland

1913 (November 11–22)

Longshore strike in Portland

1914 (February 10)

PLSBS affiliated with ILA (Local 861)

1917–18

United States in World War I

1919

Highest membership level for PLSBS (1,366)

1920s

KKK active in Maine and Portland; Red Scare

1921

Dillingham Act restricted immigration

1921 (May 20)

James Walker beaten to death on waterfront

1921 (December 21–28)

Longshore strike in Portland

1923 (January 20)

Grand Trunk (GTR) nationalized under Canadian National (CNRR), steady loss of Canadian grain exports begins

1923

Maine State Pier (MSP) completed

1923

(November 1–2) “Port's busiest 48-hour period” with four steamships discharging 4,363 passengers through immigration

1924

Johnson-Reed Act further restricted immigration

1927–53

Joseph P. Ryan is ILA president

1934 (May 9-July 31)

“The Big Strike” on Pacific Coast

1934 (July 5)

“Bloody Thursday”-two killed, forty-three injured in San Francisco longshore strike

1936

Harry Bridges takes International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union (ILWU) into the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO)

1941 (October 31)

USS Reuben James DD 245 (home base in Portland) sunk by German U-Boat off Iceland

1941 (November)

Portland Pipeline to Montreal opened

1941–45

United States in World War II

1941–45

Casco Bay (Hussey Sound) as home staging area (inner base) for the North Atlantic Fleet (COMDESLANT)

1942–45

South Portland Shipbuilding Corporation launched 274 Liberty ships

1947

Taft-Hartley Act passed over Truman's veto

1950s

McCarthyism/Red Scare

1953–63

William Bradley is ILA president

1955

Jarka Corporation ends stevedore service to Portland

1955–99

Jarka replaced by International Terminal Operating Company (ITO)

1956

Launch of Ideal X by Malcolm McLean (first container ship)

1956

Sea-Land Container Company founded

1963–87

Thomas W. “Teddy” Gleason is ILA president

1979

$10 million Bond passed for Maine State Pier (MSP)

1981 (December)

Last vessel handled by PLSBS at MSP

1981–86

No cargo handling work for PLSBS

1980s

Merrill Marine bulk cargo pier enhanced

1984

$5 million bond for container facility in Portland

1985

International Marine Terminal (IMT) rebuilt (east)

1987–2007

John Bowers is ILA president

1987

Working Waterfront Referendum passed

1991 (March 21)

Yankee Clipper, first container ship to visit Portland

1991–2008

Hapag-Lloyd stevedoring services in Portland

1994

$4 million jobs bond to rebuild IMT (west)

1998

Sea-Land merged with Maersk container line

2000–2008

P&O Ports/Dubai Ports/AIG (now Ports America)

2004

Shamrock container vessel repossessed

2005

Gulf of Maine Ocean Research facility opened

2007-present

Richard P. Hughes Jr. is ILA president

2007 (July-December)

Eimskip (Icelandic) container ship with service to Halifax, Nova Scotia

2007 (August 19)

Columbia Coastal Transport (Boston & NY/NJ)

2007

Olympia Company (Kevin Mahaney) chosen to develop Maine State Pier (MSP)

2008 (May 30)

The Cat to Nova Scotia from Ocean Gateway

2008

Maine Port Authority a division of the Maine Department of Transportation (MDOT) considers control of IMT from Portland

2008 (June)

Columbia Coastal suspends service to Portland

2008 (November)

Red Shield (Old Town) seeks bankruptcy

2008 (December)

Olympia withdraws its offer to develop MSP

2008 (December)

Ocean Properties (Tom Walsh) chosen for MSP

2008–9

Major worldwide recession begins

2009 (January)

Ocean Properties withdraws from MSP project

2009 (March 29)

Old Town Fuel and Fiber (former Red Shield) reestablishes paper shipments by container from IMT

2009 (June 1)

Maine Port Authority takes control of IMT

2009 (Summer)

Negotiations for Portland as cruise line home port; also for new container feeder service to Halifax at IMT

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