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Life and Labor in the New New South$
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Robert Zieger

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780813037950

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813037950.001.0001

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Obreros in the Peach State: The Growth of Georgia's Working-Class Mexican Immigrant Communities from a Transnational Perspective

Obreros in the Peach State: The Growth of Georgia's Working-Class Mexican Immigrant Communities from a Transnational Perspective

Chapter:
(p.214) 7 Obreros in the Peach State: The Growth of Georgia's Working-Class Mexican Immigrant Communities from a Transnational Perspective
Source:
Life and Labor in the New New South
Author(s):

Michael K. Bess

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813037950.003.0008

This chapter studies the development of Mexican working-class communities in Georgia from a transnational perspective. Job opportunities and economic crisis combined with social networks to produce dynamic flows of people and information that tied Mexican states such as Guerrero, Veracruz, and Oaxaca to the U.S. Southeast. Beginning in 1970 as Georgia's economy grew, Mexican immigrant workers became an important source of labor for carpeting mills, poultry plants, and farms. The 1982 Mexican credit crisis, the collapse of Houston's oil economy, the 1994 peso devaluation, and the 1996 Summer Olympic Games in Atlanta played major roles in contributing to the emergence of Georgia's Mexican working class community in the late twentieth century.

Keywords:   Mexican migration, Georgia, economic development, social networks, transnational labor recruitment

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