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Saved and SanctifiedThe Rise of a Storefront Church in Great Migration Philadelphia$

Deidre Helen Crumbley

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780813039848

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813039848.001.0001

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(p.187) Bibliography

(p.187) Bibliography

Source:
Saved and Sanctified
Publisher:
University Press of Florida

Bibliography references:

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