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Consent of the DamnedOrdinary Argentinians in the Dirty War$
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David M. K. Sheinin

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780813042398

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2013

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813042398.001.0001

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“A Correct, Hermeneutic Reading”: Fantasies of a Constitutional Coup and the Promotion of Indigenous Rights

“A Correct, Hermeneutic Reading”: Fantasies of a Constitutional Coup and the Promotion of Indigenous Rights

Chapter:
(p.30) 2 “A Correct, Hermeneutic Reading”: Fantasies of a Constitutional Coup and the Promotion of Indigenous Rights
Source:
Consent of the Damned
Author(s):

David M. K. Sheinin

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813042398.003.0003

After the 1976 coup, the military regime immediately set about trying to show that it was a defender of human rights. This task involved demonstrating that Argentina continued to adhere to a set of constitutional norms and legal precedents that made human rights abuses anathema to the exercise of law. In the first instance, this was an exercise in manipulation and obfuscation where an outline of legal protections of human rights led to the use of the legal system as a masque for state terror. Many Argentines believed themselves to be part of a process in which a new Argentina would establish progressive norms for the protection of human rights. A key population the military became explicitly concerned with in this ordering of Argentine life toward the modern was indigenous Argentines. One symptom of the violence of authoritarian rule was that some Argentines could find a way to ignore state terror while at the same time identifying themselves as promoters of the human rights of indigenous Argentines toward their integration into modern society as Argentines freed of their “primitive” past.

Keywords:   Argentina, Indigenous, Human Rights, Authoritarian Rule, State Terror, Military Regime

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