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Early and Middle Woodland Landscapes of the Southeast
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Early and Middle Woodland Landscapes of the Southeast

Alice P. Wright and Edward R. Henry

Abstract

This volume highlights the variety of ways that Southeastern peoples utilized, transformed, and experienced the landscapes in which they lived from ca. 1000 BC to AD 800. In doing so, the volume reveals common themes in the relationships between people, landscapes, and the built environment that characterized the Early and Middle Woodland periods in the Southeastern United States. Because these periods witnessed plant domestication and related settlement changes—the appearance of novel forms of monumental architecture and extensive exchange networks—they offer a unique opportunity for archaeol ... More

Keywords: landscape, settlement, monument, religion, interaction

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2013 Print ISBN-13: 9780813044606
Published to Florida Scholarship Online: May 2014 DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813044606.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Alice P. Wright, editor

Edward R. Henry, editor

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Contents

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1 Introduction

Alice P. Wright, and Edward R. Henry

Part One Extensive Landscapes

3 The Adena Mortuary Landscape

David Pollack, and Eric J. Schlarb

4 Like a Dead Dog

R. Berle Clay

5 The Early and Middle Woodland of the Upper Cumberland Plateau, Tennessee

Jay D. Franklin, Meagan Dennison, Maureen A. Hays, Jeffrey Navel, and Andrew D. Dye

Part Two Monumental Landscapes

6 Winchester Farm

Richard W. Jefferies, George R. Milner, and Edward R. Henry

8 Biltmore Mound and the Appalachian Summit Hopewell

Larry R. Kimball, Thomas R. Whyte, and Gary D. Crites

Part Three Landscapes of Interaction

12 Constituting Similarity and Difference in the Deep South

Thomas J. Pluckhahn, and Victor D. Thompson

Part Four Woodland Landscapes in Historical and Regional Perspective