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The Life and Lies of Paul CrouchCommunist, Opportunist, Cold War Snitch$
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Gregory S. Taylor

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780813049205

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813049205.001.0001

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Questioning Communism, 1938–1947

Questioning Communism, 1938–1947

Chapter:
(p.98) 5 Questioning Communism, 1938–1947
Source:
The Life and Lies of Paul Crouch
Author(s):

Gregory S. Taylor

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813049205.003.0006

During the nine-year period from 1938 to 1947, Crouch served in lower level positions in Alabama, Tennessee, and California. In Alabama he wrote for and edited The New South, a Communist journal designed to spread the ideology among intellectuals. He also helped organize the Southern Conference for Human Welfare, which sought to bring together Southern progressives. His success in both endeavours led to a new assignment in Tennessee, where he worked to revitalize a moribund organization by expanding into Memphis, invigorating the group at Fisk College, and generally increasing the state Party's numbers and activism. Such success led to another assignment in Northern California where he worked with union leaders to undermine the American war effort and with scientists in a campaign of atomic espionage for the Soviet Union. While in California he finally grew frustrated with intra-Party politics and shifting international policies that put the Party's needs ahead of the nation’s, and quit. Although Party leaders tried to woo him back, Crouch remained apart and relatively happy as World War II ended and America entered the post-war era.

Keywords:   Paul Crouch, Alabama, New South, Southern Conference for Human Welfare, Fisk College, Tennessee, California, atomic espionage, World War II

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