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Stinking Stones and Rocks of GoldPhosphate, Fertilizer, and Industrialization in Postbellum South Carolina$
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Shepherd W. McKinley

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780813049243

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813049243.001.0001

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River Mining and Reconstruction Politics, 1869–1874

River Mining and Reconstruction Politics, 1869–1874

Chapter:
(p.97) 4 River Mining and Reconstruction Politics, 1869–1874
Source:
Stinking Stones and Rocks of Gold
Author(s):

Shepherd W. Mckinley

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813049243.003.0005

This chapter explores the phosphate river mining industry, which had mainly different owners, laborers, and locations than land mining. Most laborers were Sea Islanders, and most river mining took place near Beaufort. The rivers were public domain so mining was subject to direct state regulation and taxation. Widespread debatesamong weakened Democrats and divided Republicans in legislative halls, on the pages of the Charleston Daily Courier, and at public meetingsover royalties, corruption, exclusive rights, monopolies, riparian rights, dredging, and navigation made regulation of this industry one of the most contentious issues during Reconstruction and beyond. Dangerous yet profitable for its workers, the river mining industry made a strong start in its first five years led by the most significant companies and businessmen,the Marine and River Phosphate Mining and Manufacturing Company (William L. Bradley), the South Carolina Phosphate and Phosphatic River Mining Company (black Republicans), the Oak Point Mines (Wyllie Campbell & Company), and especially the dominant Coosaw Mining Company (Robert Adger).

Keywords:   Marine and River Phosphate Mining and Manufacturing Company, Sea Islanders, Beaufort, Exclusive rights, Republicans, Democrats, Coosaw Mining Company

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