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Ceramic Production in Early Hispanic CaliforniaCraft, Economy, and Trade on the Frontier of New Spain$
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Russell K. Skowronek, M. James Blackman, and Ronald L. Bishop

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780813049816

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813049816.001.0001

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Supplying Glazed Ceramics to Alta California

Supplying Glazed Ceramics to Alta California

Chapter:
(p.250) 13 Supplying Glazed Ceramics to Alta California
Source:
Ceramic Production in Early Hispanic California
Author(s):

Russell K. Skowronek

M. James Blackman

Ronald L. Bishop

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813049816.003.0013

Chemical analysis of leadglazed wares recovered from the mission and presidios of Alta California has revealed new information regarding their importation from Mexico as well as patterns demonstrating local manufacture at mission locations. More than 50 percent of the analyzed lead glazed pottery appears to have been made in one to three manufacturing centers in Mexico. This source or these sources have yet to be located. Tinopacified lead glazed pottery or mayólica has been determined to have been made in Puebla, Mexico, necessitating an overland route to the coast, most likely to San Blas, for transport into Alta California. Research findings are presented within the context of previous work on Spanish ceramics and an ongoing project of compositional characterization of pottery from the Colonial and Republican manufacturing centers of Mexico.

Keywords:   Alta California, glazed pottery, Mexico

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