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Democracy Abroad, Lynching at HomeRacial Violence in Florida$
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Tameka Bradley Hobbs

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780813061047

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813061047.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.189) Conclusion
Source:
Democracy Abroad, Lynching at Home
Author(s):

Tameka Bradley Hobbs

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813061047.003.0007

The American people had been changed by their experiences during World War II, and their reactions to the lynchings of Arthur Williams, Cellos Harrison, Willie James Howard, and Jesse James Payne demonstrated a slow but steady shift in national attitudes regarding extralegal violence against African Americans. In light of the recent conflict they could see themselves more clearly through the lens of Hitlerism. With the advent of the Cold War and the battle for democracy in the world, America’s hyperbole about democracy seemed like false advertising when it came to the treatment of Americans of African descent. Communists made good use of instances of lynching and racial violence, highlighting such incidents in their publications. In the quest for world power, credibility was everything.

Keywords:   Cold War, Florida, Lynching, Race Relations, World War II

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