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Rescuing Our RootsThe African Anglo-Caribbean Diaspora in Contemporary Cuba$
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Andrea J. Queeley

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780813061092

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813061092.001.0001

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Get Out or Get Involved

Get Out or Get Involved

Revolutionary Change and Conflicting Visions of Freedom

Chapter:
(p.78) 2 Get Out or Get Involved
Source:
Rescuing Our Roots
Author(s):

Andrea J. Queeley

, John M. Kirk
Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813061092.003.0003

Chapter 2 explores the impact of the 1959 revolution on Anglo-Caribbean communities through the recollections of the children and grandchildren of immigrants who came of age in the early revolutionary period. Contrary to both popular and scholarly discourse, immigrants and their Cuban-born children were politically involved. Queeley presents multiple narratives of revolutionary political activism and argues that immigrants and their Cuban-born children occupied difficult positions as people closely associated with the U.S. presence. This was a period in which the institutions that the immigrants founded went into decline due to migration, exile on the naval base, youth disinterest, revolutionary fervor, and government repression. The author pays specific attention to gendered interpretations of revolutionary opportunity and freedom. She also argues that this period saw the overall collapse of diasporic space, though there were certain exceptions such as the access of Guantánamo residents to the Black American television show Soul Train.

Keywords:   revolution, political activism, migration, exile, gender, opportunity, freedom, diaspora, Guantánamo, Soul Train

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