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Mary Edwards BryanHer Early Life and Works$
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Canter Brown Jr. and Larry Eugene Rivers

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780813061146

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813061146.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use (for details see http://www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 18 December 2017

“Sensational and Dramatic Enough”

“Sensational and Dramatic Enough”

1880 to 1913

Chapter:
(p.276) Afterword “Sensational and Dramatic Enough”
Source:
Mary Edwards Bryan
Author(s):

Canter Brown

Larry Eugene Rivers

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813061146.003.0014

The afterword summarizes the high points of Mary Edwards Bryan’s life from the 1880 publication of Manch until her death at Clarkston, Georgia, in 1913. The authors assess the impact upon Mary of a series of suicides and natural deaths among close friends and relations and her subsequent determination to depart the South for New York. Detailing her prodigious writing and editing accomplishments and attendant celebrity in New York and Atlanta, the authors treat publisher George Munro (later George Munro's Sons) and his Fireside Companion and New York Monthly Fashion Bazar, John Seals and The Sunny South, and Joel Chandler Harris and Uncle Remus's Magazine. The authors note Mary's increasing lack of satisfaction with her own writing product, particularly underscoring the relative lack of success she enjoyed with her second novel Wild Work, which attempted objective treatment of the Coushatta Massacre. They also observe details of Bryan's personal and family life, the persistence of scandal in her social interactions, and the death of husband Iredell while evaluating the circumstances and importance of her effort to return to Florida for winters at the Indian River resort town, Coquina. Mary’s biography closes on details of her death and discussion of her professional legacies.

Keywords:   Wild Work, Coushatta Massacre, George Munro, George Munro's Sons, Fireside Companion, New York Monthly Fashion Bazar, Joel Chandler Harris, Uncle Remus's Magazine, Indian River, Coquina, Florida, celebrity, professional legacy

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