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Beyond the WallsNew Perspectives on the Archaeology of Historical Households$
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Kevin R. Fogle, James A. Nyman, and Mary C. Beaudry

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780813061559

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813061559.001.0001

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Scalar Analysis of Early Nineteenth-Century Household Assemblages

Scalar Analysis of Early Nineteenth-Century Household Assemblages

Focus on Communities of the African Atlantic

Chapter:
(p.23) 2 Scalar Analysis of Early Nineteenth-Century Household Assemblages
Source:
Beyond the Walls
Author(s):

Matthew Reeves

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813061559.003.0002

Recent research on early nineteenth-century slave households at James Madison’s Montpelier in Virginia has focused on comparative household assemblage analysis on a number of levels, including the local (between households in a single community), the regional (households within a market region), and the Atlantic (comparison of households between Jamaica and the Chesapeake). An important element in this comparative household analysis is scalar analysis. Scalar analysis is an analytical tool that allows archaeologists to find the most effective scale to explain patterns of material culture—whether it be at the local or Atlantic level. By addressing similarities and differences between household assemblages, scalar analysis allows researchers to contextualize patterns observed between individual household contexts. This chapter will examine how household comparisons made at a multiscalar level can facilitate interpretation of past human behavior, especially with regard to household market choices within a larger community framework.

Keywords:   market choice, slave households, assemblage analysis, comparative household analysis, multiscalar analysis, market regions, James Madison, Montpelier, Virginia archaeology, Jamaica archaeology

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