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Archaeology of Early Colonial Interaction at El Chorro de Maíta, Cuba$

Roberto Valcárcel Rojas

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780813061566

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813061566.001.0001

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(p.viii) Figures

(p.viii) Figures

Source:
Archaeology of Early Colonial Interaction at El Chorro de Maíta, Cuba
Publisher:
University Press of Florida

  1. 1.1. Map of Cuba and the Antilles showing the location of El Chorro de Maíta 3

  2. 2.1. Ceramic plate (El Yayal site) 12

  3. 2.2. European metal objects (El Yayal site) 13

  4. 3.1. Map of the locations of the first Hispanic towns in Cuba 54

  5. 4.1. El Chorro de Maíta Museum 64

  6. 4.2. Distribution map of the archaeological sites in Yaguajay 65

  7. 4.3. East hillside view of Cerro de Yaguajay 66

  8. 4.4. Ceramic vessels from the El Porvenir site, Yaguajay 71

  9. 4.5. Excavations of the El Chorro de Maíta cemetery 74

  10. 4.6. Location of the excavated units between 1986 and 1988 in El Chorro de Maíta 75

  11. 4.7. Re-creation of an indigenous settlement for a tourist attraction in El Chorro de Maíta 76

  12. 4.8. Map of the Burial Area in El Chorro de Maíta 77

  13. 4.9. Replicas of human remains in the El Chorro de Maíta Museum 80

  14. 4.10. Nonmetallic beads found with individual No. 57A 85

  15. 4.11. Resin and coral beads found with individual No. 58A 86

  16. 4.12. Coral beads found with individual No. 58A 86

  17. 4.13. Quartzite beads found with individual No. 64 87

  18. 4.14. Coral and jet beads found with individual No. 84 88

  19. 4.15. Resin earspools found with individual No. 94 89

  20. 4.16. Quartzite earspools found with individual No. 99 89

  21. 4.17. Textile remains found with individual No. 57A 90

  22. 4.18. Metal objects found with individual No. 57A 91

  23. 4.19. Brass tubes found in the burials 93

  24. 4.20. Metal and textile artifact found with burial No. 25 93

  25. (p.ix) 4.21. Painted coarse earthenware (white and black) vessel 96

  26. 4.22. Artifacts of European origin with indigenous modification 97

  27. 4.23. European bell 97

  28. 5.1. Map of the location of shovel test pits at 15- and 5-m intervals 102

  29. 5.2. Excavation Unit 9 104

  30. 5.3. Topographic map of the site and of areas with archaeological materials 106

  31. 5.4. Map of the location of the new excavations (2007–2009) 108

  32. 5.5. West face stratigraphy of Unit 12 108

  33. 5.6. Pig remains and ceramic artifacts of Cut 19 109

  34. 5.7. Bone projectile point from Unit 12 116

  35. 5.8. Shell ornaments 117

  36. 5.9. Ritual or ornamental objects found in Unit 16 117

  37. 5.10. Stone tools 118

  38. 5.11. Flaked siliceous artifacts 118

  39. 5.12. Glass artifact 119

  40. 5.13. Metal bell from Unit 16 120

  41. 5.14. MNI and edible biomass 122

  42. 5.15. Bone spatula and anthropomorphic pendant 134

  43. 5.16. Decorative motifs on indigenous ceramics 135

  44. 5.17. Ideal reconstruction of vessel profiles 136

  45. 5.18. Ceramic vessel fragments 136

  46. 5.19. Coin minted between 1505 and 1531 138

  47. 5.20. Coin minted between 1542 and 1558 138

  48. 5.21. Modified European ceramics 139

  49. 5.22. Metal nail and wedge 141

  50. 6.1. Unit 3 plan 164

  51. 6.2. Individuals with modified and unmodified crania 171

  52. 6.3. Tabular-erect cranial modification 172

  53. 6.4. Crania without modification 173

  54. 6.5. Dental modification 177

  55. 6.6. Remains with taphonomic indicators of compression 182

  56. 6.7. Remains with taphonomic indicators of compression and hyperflexion 183

  57. 6.8. Remains with indication of decomposition in a void 184

  58. 6.9. Remains with indication of delayed in-filling 185

  59. 6.10. Remains with postmortem cranial manipulation 187

  60. 6.11. Remains with indications of manipulation 189

  61. 6.12. Mortality rates in El Chorro de Maíta and sites in Puerto Rico 197

  62. (p.x) 7.1. SEM-EDS view of gold bead 211

  63. 7.2. SEM-EDS view of laminar pendant 211

  64. 7.3. Guanín objects from El Chorro de Maíta and Colombia 213

  65. 7.4. Guanín or tumbaga pendant from the Santana Sarmiento site 215

  66. 7.5. Guanín from the El Boniato site 215

  67. 7.6. Alterations between burials 232

  68. 7.7. Sex and age correlation in burials with more than one individual 242

  69. 7.8. Burial with very flexed legs 246

  70. 7.9. Burial in extended position 247

  71. 7.10. Burial in On Face position 248

  72. 7.11. Location of the burials with brass tubes and ornaments 250

  73. 7.12. Location of burials in the extended position 252

  74. 8.1. Mortality rates by sex 302

  75. 8.2. Mortality rates by age and territorial origin 303

  76. 8.3. Map of Cuba from 1604 329

  77. 8.4. Places near El Chorro de Maíta recognized through the use of documents 331

  78. A.1. Fragments of unglazed Olive Jars 340

  79. A.2. Fragments of glazed Olive Jars 341

  80. A.3. Green Lebrillo 343

  81. A.4. Columbia Plain majolica 345

  82. A.5. Isabela Polychrome majolica 346

  83. A.6. Santo Domingo Blue on White majolica 347

  84. A.7. Caparra Blue majolica 348

  85. A.8. Mexican Red Painted 349

  86. A.9. Aztec IV 350

  87. A.10. Fine gray ceramic 353

  88. A.11. Indigenous ceramics that copy European forms 353