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Negotiating RespectPentecostalism, Masculinity, and the Politics of Spiritual Authority in the Dominican Republic$
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Brendan Jamal Thornton

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780813061689

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813061689.001.0001

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Residual Masculinity and Gendered Charisma

Residual Masculinity and Gendered Charisma

Chapter:
(p.168) 6 Residual Masculinity and Gendered Charisma
Source:
Negotiating Respect
Author(s):

Brendan Jamal Thornton

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813061689.003.0006

Chapter 6 considers gender and religious authority in the church through an investigation of men, masculinity, and testimony. The author argues that male converts reconcile the apparent antinomy between Pentecostal Christianity and barrio masculinity by exploiting their former identities in the streets as admirable and exemplary machos. Through detailed narratives of sin and redemption grounded in the particulars of their pre-conversion lives as so-called tígueres (or “macho men”), converts assert their maleness at the same time they satisfy the esteemed conversion ideal of transformation from sinner to saint. Those converts who demonstrate the greatest reversals of fate, those who best exemplify a personal transformation from severe depravity to unquestioned righteousness, are often attributed the most prestige and recognized as charismatic exemplars and spiritual leaders in the faith community. This chapter is concerned with how local gender ideals are managed by converts who find in the church alternative but conflicting ways of being masculine.

Keywords:   tigueraje, masculinity, testimony, men, barrio masculinity, conversion narratives, sin, conversion ideal, authority, charisma

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