Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Bones of ComplexityBioarchaeological Case Studies of Social Organization and Skeletal Biology$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Haagen D. Klaus, Amanda R. Harvey, and Mark N. Cohen

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780813062235

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813062235.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use (for details see http://www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 23 May 2018

Hierarchy and Urbanism in Pre-Columbian Central Mexico

Hierarchy and Urbanism in Pre-Columbian Central Mexico

An Initial Assessment of Biological Stress and Social Structure at Teotihuacan and Monte Alban

Chapter:
(p.388) 15 Hierarchy and Urbanism in Pre-Columbian Central Mexico
Source:
Bones of Complexity
Author(s):

Rebecca Storey

Lourdes Márquez Morfín

Luis Fernando Núñez

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813062235.003.0015

The authors reconstruct biological stress patterns in pre-Hispanic urban settings at Teotihuacan in the Valley of Mexico (ca. 150 B.C.–650 A.D.) and at Monte Alban in the Valley of Oaxaca (ca. 100 B.C.–A.D. 500). Archaeologically identified rank (via burial location, mortuary elaboration, and settlement pattern data) was reduced into two broad categories—high and low social status. Odds ratio analyses revealed no difference in overall health patterns by status or sex. In other comparisons, higher status individuals appear to have been buffered against various forms of stress. Overall, Storey and coauthors demonstrate potential expressions of “osteological paradox” outcomes, in that social status and health in urban societies is a complex affair: intervening factors (population density, nutrition, and hygiene) structured by an urban setting can crosscut social strata and exert more influence on health than social organization alone.

Keywords:   Mexico, osteological paradox, biological stress patterns

Florida Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .