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Bones of ComplexityBioarchaeological Case Studies of Social Organization and Skeletal Biology$
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Haagen D. Klaus, Amanda R. Harvey, and Mark N. Cohen

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780813062235

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813062235.001.0001

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Mycenaean Hierarchy and Gender Roles

Mycenaean Hierarchy and Gender Roles

Diet and Health Inequalities in Late Bronze Age Pylos, Greece

Chapter:
(p.141) 6 Mycenaean Hierarchy and Gender Roles
Source:
Bones of Complexity
Author(s):

Lynne A. Schepartz

Sharon R. Stocker

Jack L. Davis

Anastasia Papathanasiou

Sari Miller-Antonio

Joanne M. A. Murphy

Michael Richards

Evangelia Malapani

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813062235.003.0006

Mycenaean society of the Late Bronze Age (ca. 1675–1050 B.C.) Aegean world is well known as a hierarchical culture from its archaeology, mortuary patterns, and dietary structure. In particular, Mycenaean culture featured complex heterarchies in terms of class, sex, and gender. Skeletal remains from the major site of Pylos reveal some of the biocultural interplays within life and society. This study illustrates the benefits of integrating written records with multiple lines of paleopathological and isotopic data. Shepartz et al. identify mortuary treatments that serve as indicators of social differentiation in terms of at least two clear-cut macro-class distinctions. The analysis shows that the lower social strata possessed significantly poorer quality diets and that poor oral health was especially common among women. Those of high status evidently enjoyed greater access to protein as constructions of gender may have cross-cut vertical status differentiation.

Keywords:   Late Bronze Age, Mycenaean culture, Aegean, gender

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