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We Come for GoodArchaeology and Tribal Historic Preservation at the Seminole Tribe of Florida$
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Paul N. Backhouse, Brent R. Weisman, and Mary Beth Rosebrough

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780813062280

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813062280.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use (for details see http://www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 25 February 2018

“When Is Enough, Enough?”

“When Is Enough, Enough?”

Willie Johns on Seminole History and the Tribal Historic Preservation Office, the Creek Perspective

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 “When Is Enough, Enough?”
Source:
We Come for Good
Author(s):

Willie Johns

Stephen Bridenstine

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813062280.003.0001

In order for the Tribal Historic Preservation Office (THPO) to successfully represent the tribe it must be fully engaged with the community it serves. One way therefore to measure the impact of the program is to solicit feedback from the people themselves. Historically the Seminole Tribe of Florida is made up of speakers of two related but culturally distinct languages—Miccosukee and Creek. Language affiliation and cultural identity are intertwined and distinct. Today this traditional dichotomy is made more complex by the cultural and biological influence of non-Seminole peoples. Willie Johns offers a Creek historical perspective, from a respected elder who has a long history of working very closely with the THPO.

Keywords:   Seminole Tribe of Florida, Tribal Historic Preservation Office, Creek

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