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We Come for GoodArchaeology and Tribal Historic Preservation at the Seminole Tribe of Florida$
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Paul N. Backhouse, Brent R. Weisman, and Mary Beth Rosebrough

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780813062280

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813062280.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use (for details see http://www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 20 May 2018

“Bending and Not Breaking”

“Bending and Not Breaking”

Seminole History and the Tribal Historic Preservation Office, the Miccosukee Perspective

Chapter:
(p.20) 2 “Bending and Not Breaking”
Source:
We Come for Good
Author(s):

Marty Bowers

Stephen Bridenstine

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813062280.003.0002

Marty Bowers offers a perspective on the THPO as a citizen of the Seminole Tribe of Florida and a member of the Wind Clan. Born in 1971 and raised on the Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation, Bowers rode the bus eighty miles round-trip every day to attend public school in Clewiston, Florida. On the weekends, he joined his father’s Creek-speaking family for services at a Baptist Church on the Brighton Reservation. Raised in a bilingual household, Bowers is today more fluent in the Miccosukee language, the dominant language on the Big Cypress Reservation. Throughout his career, Bowers worked for the Seminole Tribe as a ranch hand, librarian, and museum exhibits specialist. From 2007 to 2010, Bowers served as a cultural advisor to the Tribal Historic Preservation Office. In this wide-ranging and insightful interview, he relates his personal journey of cultural discovery and shares his thoughts and feelings about Seminole history and the work of the Tribal Historic Preservation Office.

Keywords:   Seminole Tribe of Florida, Big Cypress Seminole Indian Reservation, Miccosukee language

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