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We Come for GoodArchaeology and Tribal Historic Preservation at the Seminole Tribe of Florida$
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Paul N. Backhouse, Brent R. Weisman, and Mary Beth Rosebrough

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780813062280

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813062280.001.0001

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On-Reservation Projects and the Tribal Historic Preservation Office’s Role within Tribal Government

On-Reservation Projects and the Tribal Historic Preservation Office’s Role within Tribal Government

Chapter:
(p.78) 5 On-Reservation Projects and the Tribal Historic Preservation Office’s Role within Tribal Government
Source:
We Come for Good
Author(s):

Anne Mullins

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813062280.003.0005

The Seminole Tribe of Florida reservation system consists of five geographically dispersed parcels of land that are spread out across the length and breadth of South Florida. These lands, held in trust by the U.S. government, give the Seminole Tribe of Florida the unenviable distinction of being the most geographically dispersed of any federally recognized tribal entity residing in North America. The on-reservation project cultural-review process undertaken by the THPO is central to three of its four component sections: Tribal archaeology, collections, and archaeometry. Working closely with a group of local reservation-based cultural advisors (preservation review board), the on-reservation cultural-review process holistically encompasses both the tangible and intangible when considering a determination of effect under the Tribal Cultural Resources Ordinance. It is important to note that some tangible resources, like medicinal plants, move across the landscape. It is therefore vital that determinations represent the result of an ongoing dialogue with the community. Working at the reservation scale this is a possibility that might not be practically achievable at the state or national level.

Keywords:   Seminole Tribe of Florida, Tribal Cultural Resources Ordinance, archaeometry

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