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We Come for GoodArchaeology and Tribal Historic Preservation at the Seminole Tribe of Florida$
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Paul N. Backhouse, Brent R. Weisman, and Mary Beth Rosebrough

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780813062280

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813062280.001.0001

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Tarakkvlkv (Land of Palms)

Tarakkvlkv (Land of Palms)

Bridging the Gap between Archaeology and Tribal Perspectives

Chapter:
(p.179) 10 Tarakkvlkv (Land of Palms)
Source:
We Come for Good
Author(s):

Maureen Mahoney

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813062280.003.0010

The recent history of the Brighton reservation is contained in the settlement patterns of the camps established by the various groups moving onto lands of a hostile government. Collective memory is transferred through oral histories, but the patterns that emerge can be viewed through a broad temporal lens to reveal the sociocultural motivations of the broader population. The location of camps near the periphery of the reservation in the early years speaks to the mistrust of the families concerned about the ease of escape should they find themselves in peril from the U.S. government. Two decades later the clustering of camps near schools, roads, and trading stores demonstrates a transition and connectedness to the non-Seminole world. These years were certainly formative in the history of the Tribe. GIS is the tool the THPO uses to draw together oral history and archaeological information in the telling of these important stories.

Keywords:   GIS, Brighton reservation, oral history

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