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We Come for GoodArchaeology and Tribal Historic Preservation at the Seminole Tribe of Florida$
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Paul N. Backhouse, Brent R. Weisman, and Mary Beth Rosebrough

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780813062280

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813062280.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use (for details see http://www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 25 February 2018

Archaeometry

Archaeometry

Where GIS Meets the People

Chapter:
(p.206) 11 Archaeometry
Source:
We Come for Good
Author(s):

Juan J. Cancel

Paul N. Backhouse

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813062280.003.0011

The archaeometry section is crucial to the operation of all the THPO areas. The philosophy of the section is technological inclusivity—providing the tools and support for applications like GIS Portal and the hardware to enable mobile mapping. These solutions can be operationalized both by staff and the Tribal community. This inclusivity has resulted in some dynamic projects that have been the calling card of the THPO within the community and have forged connections that transcend cultural differences. The ability to generate maps and other digital and physical media promotes collaborative dialogue and active engagement between the community and the THPO, allowing active participation by all constituents and informed cultural heritage decision-making. This is perhaps exemplified by the concept of participatory mapping in which stakeholder groups within the Tribal communities actively work together to provide the information that is then geographically realized. The resultant maps often allow Tribal elders the ability to visually communicate cultural information with younger generations accustomed to receiving information in a geographic format.

Keywords:   GIS, archaeometry, participatory mapping

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