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We Come for GoodArchaeology and Tribal Historic Preservation at the Seminole Tribe of Florida$
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Paul N. Backhouse, Brent R. Weisman, and Mary Beth Rosebrough

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780813062280

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813062280.001.0001

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Let’s Celebrate!

Let’s Celebrate!

The Red Barn as Community Heritage

Chapter:
(p.221) 12 Let’s Celebrate!
Source:
We Come for Good
Author(s):

Carrie Dilley

Lewis Gopher

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813062280.003.0012

The vernacular architecture of the Seminole Tribe of Florida has largely been given short shrift by architectural historians who tend to celebrate brick-and-mortar construction able to last hundreds of years. Traditional Seminole chickee construction emphasizes sustainable building techniques. Chickee structures were built for the needs of a population who frequently moved as a result of the relentless pursuit of the U.S. Army and the ongoing search for available resources. Approaching the issue of architectural heritage management is therefore significantly different in an on-reservation setting. While necessary as part of the National Historic Preservation Act Section 106 review process, opportunities for the tribal architectural historian to engage in meaningful projects with the community were extremely limited. Against this background, the Red Barn project represents a sea change in the history of the THPO and as a partner for community heritage activism.

Keywords:   Seminole Tribe of Florida, vernacular architecture, Seminole chickee

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