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We Come for GoodArchaeology and Tribal Historic Preservation at the Seminole Tribe of Florida$
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Paul N. Backhouse, Brent R. Weisman, and Mary Beth Rosebrough

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780813062280

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813062280.001.0001

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The Significance of People and Preservation

The Significance of People and Preservation

Tribal Archaeology, Traditional Cultural Properties, and Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act

Chapter:
(p.297) 16 The Significance of People and Preservation
Source:
We Come for Good
Author(s):

Timothy A. Parsons

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813062280.003.0016

Although they serve different communities with differing cultural belief systems, both the THPO and the State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) share very similar preservation-centric goals. Florida is a very long state, and the relationship between the SHPO (in Tallahassee) and the THPO (in Big Cypress) presents a challenge to employees of both offices with little opportunity for interaction. Nevertheless, the similarity in mission and cooperative personnel have resulted in a fruitful relationship between the two institutions. This is not to say that culturally mandated project–based disagreements don’t exist. However, staff at both offices demonstrate the cultural and professional respect necessary to work well with one another. Opportunities to collaborate on projects of mutual interest have strengthened this relationship, and we have found much common ground. A view from outside the THPO is always welcome as we learn from one another.

Keywords:   National Historic Preservation Act, State Historic Preservation Office, Big Cypress

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