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Black Well-BeingHealth and Selfhood in Antebellum Black Literature$
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Andrea Stone

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780813062570

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813062570.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Human, Person, Self: Blackness and Well-Being

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Black Well-Being
Author(s):

Andrea Stone

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813062570.003.0001

Defining the analytical terms the book’s subsequent chapters develop, the introduction historicizes and distinguishes concepts of humanness, personhood, and selfhood with which black and white antebellum thinkers engaged to conceptualize black well-being. Following chapter summaries, this chapter introduces the term transcolonial African diaspora as a useful analytic for reading the authors’ and orators’ interrogations and complications of definitions of colony, nation, empire, and republic and to investigate African diasporic concerns in slave narratives of Canada and parts of the Caribbean before they became nations. The chapter concludes with an assertion of the continued urgency in reassessing black health and well-being and the legacies of New World slavery.

Keywords:   humanness, personhood, selfhood, diaspora, health, well-being, Caribbean

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