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Documenting the UndocumentedLatino/a Narratives and Social Justice in the Era of Operation Gatekeeper$
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Marta Caminero-Santangelo

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780813062594

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813062594.001.0001

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Unauthorized Plots

Unauthorized Plots

Life Writing, Transnationalism, and the Possibilities of Agency

Chapter:
(p.194) 5 Unauthorized Plots
Source:
Documenting the Undocumented
Author(s):

Marta Caminero-Santangelo

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813062594.003.0006

This chapter examines two extended life narratives by undocumented subjects: Ramón “Tianguis” Pérez’s memoir Diary of an Undocumented Immigrant and the oral history of an undocumented Nicaraguan immigrant, “Yamileth,” recorded by Diana Walta Hart in Undocumented in L.A. Neither Yamileth nor Pérez sees themselves as a permanent immigrant (illegal or otherwise) in their life stories. Thus, while both texts resist certain strands of dominant discourse about illegal immigrants, they also express a transnational sensibility that exhibits a strong sense of agency about the subjects’ plotting of their own life stories. This, even while perhaps simultaneously confirming negative rhetoric about recent immigrants’ unwillingness to assimilate to “American” culture or be fully incorporated into U.S. society.

Keywords:   life narrative, Diary of an Undocumented Immigrant, Undocumented in L.A, transnational, undocumented, illegal immigrants, assimilation

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