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Simón BolívarTravels and Transformations of a Cultural Icon$
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Maureen G. Shanahan and Ana María Reyes

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780813062624

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813062624.001.0001

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Dancing with the Enemy

Dancing with the Enemy

Diplomacy in the Revolutionary Era

Chapter:
(p.48) 2 Dancing with the Enemy
Source:
Simón Bolívar
Author(s):

Juan Francisco Sans

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813062624.003.0003

Simón Bolívar’s love of dance has been used by his critics as evidence of vanagloria. Far from being a frivolous and banal activity, Sanse demonstrates that dance was used during the independence wars as a powerful political weapon. To prove this assertion, this paper discusses the use of dance (e.g., the waltz, fandango, contradance, Santanderana), especially at grand balls, in the period from the beginning of the independence process in New Granada and Venezuela in 1810 to the end of the Colombian project with the death of Simón Bolívar in 1830. In order to do that, Sans refers to the theories of political economy of music by Jacques Attali and Véronique Hébrard’s concept of “imposed musical events.”

Keywords:   Dance, Contradance, Waltz, Ball, Santanderana, Fandango, Véronique Hébrard, Jacques Attali

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