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Gender and the Rhetoric of Modernity in Spanish America, 1850-1910$
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Lee Skinner

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780813062846

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813062846.001.0001

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Women’s Education

Women’s Education

Chapter:
(p.105) 4 Women’s Education
Source:
Gender and the Rhetoric of Modernity in Spanish America, 1850-1910
Author(s):

Lee Skinner

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813062846.003.0004

This chapter argues that the plasticity of discourses about modernity meant that both those who favored women’s full access to higher education and those who wanted more modest improvements that did not threaten the status quo deployed the same series of concepts about modernity, progress, and women’s role in the emerging nation-states. Ambivalence about women’s role is demonstrated in La emancipada by Miguel Riofrío, which limits its argument for education for women by depicting an overly educated heroine who is socially destructive. The chapter also analyzes essays in the periodicals La Aljaba, El Museo Literario, El Perú Ilustrado, and the positivist journal Violetas del Anáhuac as well as Juana Manuela Gorriti’s literary salons and another essay by Laureana Wright de Kleinhans.

Keywords:   Education, Nation-states, Miguel Riofrío, Periodicals, Juana Manuela Gorriti, Laureana Wright de Kleinhans

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