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Cuban Archaeology in the Caribbean$
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Ivan Roksandic

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781683400028

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9781683400028.001.0001

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An Archaeological Overview of the Caribbean Coast of Nicaragua

An Archaeological Overview of the Caribbean Coast of Nicaragua

Chapter:
(p.17) 2 An Archaeological Overview of the Caribbean Coast of Nicaragua
Source:
Cuban Archaeology in the Caribbean
Author(s):

SagrArio Balladares Navarro

Leonardo Lechado Ríos

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9781683400028.003.0003

Nicaragua's Caribbean coast is one of the archaeologically least known regions in the Circum-Caribbean. The first archaeological data obtained there were produced only in the nineteen-seventies in the works of the American researcher Richard Magnus and the Nicaraguan archaeologist Jorge Espinoza. Before that, all we had were descriptive data incorporated in the chronicles and narratives by travelers and explorers. However, between 1998 and 2006, several joint studies of the Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB) and the National Autonomous University of Nicaragua (UNAN, Managua) focused on the sites on the Atlantic Coast. Further research was carried on from 2012 to 2014 through joint efforts of the BICU-CIDCA University in Bluefields and the UNAN. As a result, an important number of archaeological sites was documented, both shell-matrix sites located in the ancient coastal areas and agricultural sites associated with complex settlements. This new project also confirmed through 14C dating that the Angie shell midden, one of the oldest reported sites in Central America, is more than 6000 years old.

Keywords:   Nicaragua, Coast, Mangus, Espinoza, Sites, Settlements, Shell midden

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