Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Mesoamerican FigurinesSmall-Scale Indices of Large-Scale Social Phenomena$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Christina T. Halperin, Katherine A. Faust, Rhonda Taube, and Aurore Giguet

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780813033303

Published to Florida Scholarship Online: September 2011

DOI: 10.5744/florida/9780813033303.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM FLORIDA SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.florida.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Florida, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in FLASO for personal use.date: 02 August 2021

Figurines as Bearers of and Burdens in Late Classic Maya State Politics

Figurines as Bearers of and Burdens in Late Classic Maya State Politics

Chapter:
(p.378) 13 Figurines as Bearers of and Burdens in Late Classic Maya State Politics
Source:
Mesoamerican Figurines
Author(s):

Christina T. Halperin

Publisher:
University Press of Florida
DOI:10.5744/florida/9780813033303.003.0013

Clay figurines are portrayed by Mesoamerican scholars to be unrelated to state affairs and politics for the following reasons: the fact that the figurines are often recovered in domestic settings; the fact that supernatural and human being depictions were hardly ever represented in media; and the Western analytical separation of private and public domains, as well as the extension of political and domestic aspects. However, others would argue that art and iconography are innately political, and that the domestic context of use does not necessarily entail an apolitical statement. As such, the fundamental question arises regarding how figurines were able to promote Maya state relations and rulership symbols, or alternate perspectives and values to the Maya state system. This chapter attempts to concentrate on a theoretical framework of mass media studies in examining figurines from the site of Motul de San José, Petén, Guatemala.

Keywords:   state affairs, politics, iconography, Maya state relations, state system, rulership symbols

Florida Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .